4 Tips for Athletes Looking to Improve Social Media Presence

4 Tips for Athletes Looking to Improve Social Media Presence

Last week we took a look at some tips brands can use in order improve their social media presence. This week, we focus on the other side of the equation, the athletes. Let’s take a look at some tips athletes can use in order to improve their social media presence.

 

1. Embrace Social Media (If You Haven’t Already)

Social media is the perfect vessel to use to create, increase and retain a following because people can connect easily and instantly with one another.

However, many athletes are not currently receiving social media support from their agents, professional organizations and/or teams. This is a missed opportunity to increase the value of sponsorships and endorsements or to promote a personal cause.

In a recent Wall Street Journal article, David Carter, head of the USC Sports Business Institute said, “As celebrity endorsements move beyond the superstars, the mid-level player with personality and social-media savvy can reach endorsement and name-recognition levels that were once only the domain of the best of the best.”

The WSJ article cites former New York Yankee and current Cleveland Indian, Nick Swisher, as an athlete who uses social media to build his personal brand. Although there are bigger stars in baseball, as a result of his “social media cachet”, Swisher was asked by Mercedes-Benz to participate in the automobile manufacturer’s Super Bowl XLV campaign. Swisher enlisted the support of his Twitter followers and in the process helped to raise money for his charity.

If you haven’t already, it is time to embrace social media. As an athlete, it is a great way to connect with fans and maximize the value of endorsements.

 

2. Engage With Your Followers

Brands aim to please consumers. So, in order to please a brand (and be selected for lucrative endorsement campaigns), athletes need to aim to please consumers.

So, exactly how do you please fans and consumers? The best way is to engage with your fans and consumers. Consumers want an endorser who is willing to invite them into a part of their life and authentically engage with them. For example, they want someone who responds to social media posts and someone who posts unique messages, photos and videos of sites or experiences that they otherwise may not be able to be a part of.

Using your own unique and genuine personality to build a relationship and engage with your followers builds trust between you and your followers. At the same time it also signals to brands that you have influence amongst your followers and that you just may be the right athlete for an endorsement campaign!

 

3. Be Professional

It is important to display and maintain a professional image when posting, even if the post is not directly related to an endorsement. Any post you made in the past or make in the future will shape your image and impact endorsement potential. Brands will take this in to account when selecting which athletes to choose for endorsements because your image will now be used to reflect the brand’s own image.

Once you sign an endorsement deal, you will now be expected to assume accountability for what you post and maintain a professional image for the brands you represent.

 

4. Be Yourself

Your fans and followers love you for who you are. Use social media to further express your personality and showcase your experiences with fans.

Don’t try to be something or someone you’re not. If you do, people will easily pick up on that and will not be as likely to engage with you. Stay true to yourself and authentic engagement with fans will follow.

 

The Ball is in Your Court

Are you an athlete looking to capitalize on your endorsement potential?

Contact us at opendorse today so we can get you signed up (for free) and you can begin taking full advantage of your endorsement potential!

 

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