High School NIL: State-by-state regulations for name, image and likeness rights

View the map on mobile

*Updated 9/24/2021*

On July 1, the athlete marketing world grew by nearly 500,000 student-athletes across college athletics. This led to two immediate questions: 

  1. How can I get paid?  
  1. And when can I start? 

The first continues to be answered each day, with countless student-athletes monetizing their name, image and likeness (NIL) in a variety of creative ways. The second, however, remains in question for many high school athletes across the country. 

On August 2, Quinn Ewers made national headlines with his decision to enroll at Ohio State, foregoing his senior season of football at Texas powerhouse Carroll Senior High School. One underlying factor when understanding Ewers’ decision was the restriction he faced under Texas State Law which prohibits any prospective student-athlete from being compensated for their NIL prior to enrolling at a college or university. Following his move to campus, CBS Sports reported Ewers inked a $1.4 million NIL deal.  

Though Ewers is a clear standout, he was not the first and will not be the last high school student-athlete with significant NIL earning potential. According to USA Today, nine American high schoolers qualified for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, including Lydia Jacoby, the 17-year-old from Seward, Alaska who took home gold in the 100-meter Breaststroke. While many high school athletic associations have amateurism-related exceptions in place for Olympians, the vast majority of these associations prohibit high school student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. 

This article aims to break down existing NIL regulations pertaining to high school student-athletes in all 50 states, plus Washington D.C. To be clear, this article is a broad examination and contact with all associations was not able to be made. If you are a student-athlete, parent, brand, or interested individual, it is strongly encouraged to please contact your high school athletic director and/or high school association for more information.  

About each state

Alabama

Governing Body: Alabama High School Athletic Association

State NIL Law: House Bill 404 – does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Confirmed Prohibited

Governance: 2020-21 Handbook

Applicable Language: Section 8, Amateur Rule

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration cited Section 8, which defines “an amateur is one who does not use his/her knowledge of athletics or athletic skill for gain”.

Alaska

Governing Body: Alaska School Activities Association

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Under Membership Considerations

Governance: 2021-22 Handbook

Applicable Language: Article 8, Amateurism

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration made it clear that NIL would be a topic of discussion at upcoming Board of Directors meetings.

Arizona

Governing Body: Arizona Interscholastic Association

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 1296 – could be applied to high school athletes broadly, as individuals who “may be eligible in the future” for college athletics

Status: Needs Clarity

Governance: 2021-22 Constitution, Bylaws, Policies and Procedures

Applicable Language: 15.11 Amateur Rule

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. The 15.11 Amateur Rule states an amateur athlete is one who, “has never used or is not using his/her knowledge of athletics or athletic skill in an athletic contest for financial gain.” While this language encompasses concepts such as pay-for-play, additional context is needed when considering NIL opportunities.

Arkansas

Governing Body: Arkansas Activities Association

State NIL Law: House Bill 1671 – does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Prohibited**

Governance: 2019-20 Handbook

Applicable Language: Rule 10, Amateurism

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. While additional confirmation was not made by the association, Rule 10 reads a student-athlete loses their amateur status by, “directly or indirectly accept gifts, products, awards or monetary compensation for permitting his/her name, picture, or person to be used to advertise, promote or recommend a product, service, commercial venture or political venture.”

California

Governing Body: California Interscholastic Federation

State NIL Law: Senate Bill No. 26 – does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Confirmed Permitted

Governance: 2021-22 Constitution and Bylaws

Applicable Language: 212, Amateur Status

Notes: The current regulations permit a student-athlete to be compensated for their NIL, so long as there is no recognition of the student-athlete’s school, school logos, uniforms or insignias. Further information from the administration pointed to Bylaw 212 which reads a student-athlete shall become ineligible if they are, “wearing a school team uniform or any identifying school insignia while appearing in any advertisement, promotional activity or endorsement for any commercial product or service” or “lending his/her name and team affiliation for purposes of commercial endorsement”.

Colorado

Governing Body: Colorado High School Activities Association

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 20-123 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Needs Clarity

Governance: 2021-22 Constitution and Bylaws

Applicable Language: 2000 Amateur Status, 2010 Awards

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. The amateurism ruling states a student-athlete, “may not compete for or accept cash for playing some part or all aspects of a sport.” While this language encompasses concepts such as pay-for-play, additional context is needed when considering NIL opportunities.

Connecticut

Governing Body: Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference

State NIL Law: House Bill 6402 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Prohibited**

Governance: 2020-21 Handbook

Applicable Language: 4.5 Amateur Athletic Guidelines

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. The Amateur Athletic Guidelines read, “if a student-athlete’s appearance on radio, television or print/electronic media is related in any way to his/her athletic ability or prestige, the athlete may not under any circumstance receive remuneration for his/her appearance.”

Delaware

Governing Body: Delaware Interscholastic Athletic Association

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Confirmed Prohibited

Governance: Title 14 Education Delaware Administrative Code

Applicable Language: 2.5 Eligibility, Amateur Status

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration concluded that if the regulation should change an update will be provided.

District of Columbia

Governing Body: District of Columbia State Athletic Association

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Needs Clarity

Governance: Policies, Rules, and Regulations Governing Athletics

Applicable Language: Section H, Amateur Status

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. The amateur status regulations state a student-athlete loses their eligibility if they use their, “status to promote or endorse a commercial product or service on the internet, in newsprint, radio, television advertisement or any other form of media, or personal appearance.” However, the same regulation reads, “accepting compensation for teaching lessons, coaching, or officiating shall not jeopardize the student’s amateur status.” Additional context is needed when considering all NIL opportunities.

Florida

Governing Body: Florida High School Athletic Association

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 646 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Prohibited**

Governance: Bylaws of the Florida High School Athletic Association

Applicable Language: 9.9 Amateurism, 9.9.3 Permissible Awards, Gifts or Other Compensation

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. The amateurism bylaws read that a student-athlete loses their amateur status if they, “capitalizing on athletic fame by receiving money or gifts of a monetary nature”.

Georgia

Governing Body: Georgia High School Association

State NIL Law: House Bill 617 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Confirmed Prohibited

Governance: Constitution and Bylaws

Applicable Language: 1.90 Amateur Status/Awards

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration confirmed that a student-athlete loses their amateur status if they, “capitalizing on athletic fame by receiving money or gifts with monetary value except college scholarships”.

Hawaii

Governing Body: Hawaii High School Athletic Association

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Needs Clarity

Governance: Administrative Regulations

Applicable Language: Section I

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. The applicable regulations state a student-athlete can lose their amateurism status if they have competed for money in any organized athletic activity, however this does not explicitly address NIL activities.

Idaho

Governing Body: Idaho High School Activities Association

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Under Membership Considerations

Governance: Rules and Regulations

Applicable Language: 8-4 Amateur Status, 8-5 Awards

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. However, administration has confirmed the IHSAA is currently in the process of modifying rules to address NIL. The ratification process will require, at the minimum, two Board meetings to pass, with the most recent meeting occurring in the month of September.

Illinois

Governing Body: Illinois High School Association

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 2338 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Confirmed Permitted

Governance: IHSA Handbook 2021

Applicable Language: 3.080 Amateurism

Notes: The current regulations permit a student-athlete to be compensated for their NIL, so long as the compensation to the student-athlete does not exceed $75 in value. Further information from the administration confirmed a student-athlete that develops their own business unrelated to their participation in an athletic contest or recognition would not be subject to this limitation.

Indiana

Governing Body: Indiana High School Athletic Association

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Prohibited**

Governance: 2021-22 By-Laws & Articles of Incorporation

Applicable Language: Rule 5, Rule 6

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Rule 5 on amateurism states a student-athlete loses their amateur status if they have, “capitalized on athletic fame by receiving money or gifts of a monetary nature”.

Iowa

Governing Body: Iowa High School Athletic Association

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Needs Clarity

Governance: 2020-21 IHSAA Handbook

Applicable Language: 36.14(3) Awards

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. The applicable regulations state a student-athlete can lose their amateurism status if they have competed for money in any organized athletic activity, however this does not explicitly address NIL activities.

Kansas

Governing Body: Kansas State High School Activities Association

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Under Membership Considerations

Governance: KSHSAA Handbook 2021-22

Applicable Language: Rule 21

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. However, KSHSAA administration has confirmed more clarity is needed on the topic and inquiries are being handled on a case-by-case basis.

Kentucky

Governing Body: Kentucky High School Athletic Association

State NIL Law: Executive Order – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Confirmed Prohibited

Governance: Bylaws of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association

Applicable Language: Bylaw 10 Amateur/Award

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Bylaw 10 on amateurism states a student-athlete loses their amateur status if they are, “capitalizing on athletic fame by receiving money or other gifts of monetary value not specifically approved by Sec. 2 or 4 of this rule”. Section 2 and Section 4 pertain to scholarships and pre-approved awards not exceeding $300 in value.

Louisiana

Governing Body: Louisiana High School Athletic Association

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 60 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Needs Clarity

Governance: The Louisiana High School Athletic Association 2021— 2022 HANDBOOK

Applicable Language: 1.25 Maintaining Amateur Status, 7.2 School Awards

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. Section 1.25 states, “no student shall, at any time, receive any salary or financial compensation, except actual expenses.” While this language encompasses concepts such as pay-for-play, additional context is needed when considering NIL opportunities.

Maine

Governing Body: Maine Principals’ Association

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Permitted**

Governance: 2021-2022 Handbook

Applicable Language: Section 2, Student Eligibility

Notes: While there has been no direct confirmation from the administration, the existing amateurism rules do not clearly address NIL opportunities and their permissibility. Further clarification from the MPA is needed on this topic.

Maryland

Governing Body: Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association

State NIL Law: House Bill 125 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Confirmed Prohibited

Governance: 2021 Handbook

Applicable Language: 10 Amateur Rules, .08 Awards and Recognition

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the MPSSAA confirmed the amateur ruling that, “Students who have not used or are not using their athletic skill as players for financial gain, or who have not competed under assumed names as players, shall be considered amateurs.”

Massachusetts

Governing Body: Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Confirmed Prohibited

Governance: MIAA Handbook July 1, 2021 – June 30, 2023

Applicable Language: 10 Academic Awards, 47 Amateurism

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration confirmed Section 10 which states a student-athlete loses their amateur status by, “capitalizing on athletic fame by receiving money or gifts of monetary value (scholarships to institutions of higher learning are specifically exempted)”.

Michigan

Governing Body: Michigan High School Athletic Association

State NIL Law: House Bill 5217 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Under Membership Considerations

Governance: Coaches Guidebook 2021-22 

Applicable Language: VIII Eligibility Rules for Athletes

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. However, MHSAA administration has confirmed this is “a discussion on the table” and current inquiries around student-athlete NIL opportunities are being handled on a case-by-case basis.

Minnesota

Governing Body: Minnesota State High School League

State NIL Law: N/A

Status: Permitted**

Governance: 2021-2022 MSHSL OFFICIAL HANDBOOK 

Applicable Language: 201 Amateur Status, 204 Awards

Notes: While there has been no direct confirmation from the administration, the existing amateurism rules do not clearly address NIL opportunities and their permissibility. Further clarification from the MSHSL is needed on this topic.

Mississippi

Governing Body: Mississippi High School Activities Association

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 2313 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Confirmed Prohibited

Governance: 2021-2022 MHSAA HANDBOOK

Applicable Language: 2.39 Amateur Rule, 7.21 Awards

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration confirmed Section 2.39 which states amateurism status is lost if a student-athlete has “accepted money”. Additionally, the MHSAA cited the NFHS’s ruling against NIL opportunities for high school student-athletes.

Missouri

Governing Body: Missouri State High School Activities Association

State NIL Law: House Bill 297 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Confirmed Prohibited

Governance: 2021 Official Handbook 

Applicable Language: 3.6.1 Amateur Status, 3.6.2 Awards

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Section 3.6.1 on amateurism states a student-athlete loses their amateur status if they are, “capitalizing on athletic fame by receiving money, gifts of monetary value, or merchandise”.

Montana

Governing Body: Montana High School Association

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 248 – Does not apply to high school athletes

Status: Confirmed Prohibited

Governance: 2021-22 Handbook 

Applicable Language: 15.1 Awards, 16 Amateur Rule

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration confirmed Section 16 which states amateurism status is lost if a student-athlete has “accepted money”. Awards allowable under MHSA rules must be no greater than $100 in value. 

Nebraska 

Governing Body: Nebraska School Activities Association 

State NIL Law: Legislative Bill 962 – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Under Membership Considerations 

Governance: 2019-2020 Constitution & Bylaws 

Applicable Language: 2.15 Awards to Students and Schools, 3.7 Amateur Rule 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. However, NSAA administration has confirmed that while there have not been many inquiries around opportunities, this was a talking point at a recent Board meeting. 

Nevada 

Governing Body: Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association 

State NIL Law: Assembly Bill 254 – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Confirmed Prohibited 

Governance: Chapter 385B – Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association 

Applicable Language: NAC 385B.374, NAC 385B.650 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the association established that the NIAA’s regulations are part of the administrative code of the State of Nevada, and revisions to these regulations would require action by the State government. 

New Hampshire 

Governing Body: New Hampshire Interscholastic Athletic Association 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Needs Clarity 

Governance: BY-LAW ARTICLE II Eligibility 

Applicable Language: Sect. 6 Amateur Status 

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. Section 6 states a student-athlete loses their amateurism status by, “appearing on radio or television related in any way to his/her athletic ability or prestige; the athlete may not under any circumstance receive remuneration for his/her appearance.” While this language encompasses NIL appearances, additional context is needed when considering other NIL opportunities. 

New Jersey 

Governing Body: New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association 

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 971 – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Under Membership Considerations 

Governance: NJSIAA GENERAL INFORMATION CONSTITUTION BY-LAWS RULES AND REGULATIONS 2020 – 2021 

Applicable Language: Article V ELIGIBILITY OF ATHLETES 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. However, NJSIAA administration has confirmed that there will likely be adaptations made this fall to the amateurism bylaws, which would the go into effect in the coming future. 

New Mexico 

Governing Body: New Mexico Activities Association 

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 94 – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Prohibited** 

Governance: NMAA Handbook 

Applicable Language: 6.18 ATHLETIC AMATEUR STATUS 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Rule 6 on amateurism addresses a student-athlete loses their amateur status if they are endorsing a product.  

New York 

Governing Body: New York State Public High School Athletic Association 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Under Membership Considerations 

Governance: NYSPHSAA Rules & Regulations 

Applicable Language: Section 2 Amateur 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. However, NYSPHSAA administration has confirmed that there have been targeted discussions around NIL and the upcoming October Board meeting is likely when considerations will be made regarding regulation changes. 

North Carolina 

Governing Body: North Carolina High School Athletic Association 

State NIL Law: Executive Order – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Confirmed Prohibited 

Governance: NCHSAA Handbook 2020-2021 

Applicable Language: 1.2.15 Amateur Rule 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration confirmed Rule 1.2.15 which states amateurism status is lost if a student-athlete has “accepted money”. Awards allowable under MHSA rules must be no greater than $250 in value. 

North Dakota 

Governing Body: North Dakota High School Activities Association 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Confirmed Permitted 

Governance: Constitution and Bylaws, July 2021 

Applicable Language: Article VIII: Amateurism, Article IX: Awards 

Notes: The current regulations permit a student-athlete to be compensated for their NIL, so long as the compensation to the student-athlete does not exceed $300 in value. Further information from the administration confirmed more clarity around NIL opportunities will be explored in the coming months. 

Ohio 

Governing Body: Ohio High School Athletic Association 

State NIL Law: Executive Order – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Under Membership Considerations 

Governance: OHSAA Bylaws 

Applicable Language: Bylaw 4, Section 10 – Amateur, Bylaw 5 — Awards 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. However, OHSAA administration has confirmed that NIL has been a topic of discussion among the membership. It is of note that any regulation changes in the OHSAA Bylaws would not go into effect until May 2022, at the earliest. 

Oklahoma 

Governing Body: Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association 

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 48 – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Prohibited** 

Governance: OSSAA 2021-2022 Constitution 

Applicable Language: Rule 5 – Amateurism and Awards 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Rule 5 on amateurism addresses a student-athlete loses their amateur status by, “capitalizing on athletic fame by receiving money or gifts of monetary value (scholarships given by institutions of higher learning are specifically exempted)”. 

Oregon 

Governing Body: Oregon School Activities Association 

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 5 – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Under Membership Considerations 

Governance: OSAA 2021-22 Handbook 

Applicable Language: 8.4. Awards 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. However, OSAA administration has confirmed that an interpretation of NIL for the membership is being created and will likely be made available in the near future. 

Pennsylvania 

Governing Body: Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association 

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 381 – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Confirmed Prohibited 

Governance: 2021-2022 PIAA Constitution and By-laws 

Applicable Language: ARTICLE II Amateur Status and Awards 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration confirmed Article II which states a student-athlete’s amateurism status is lost “by appearing in public on behalf of such entity” for compensation. 

Rhode Island 

Governing Body: Rhode Island Interscholastic League 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Needs Clarity 

Governance: Rules and Regulations 

Applicable Language: Section 9.  Awards, Section 19. Amateurism 

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. Section 9 states a student-athlete loses their amateurism status by, “capitalizing on athletic fame by receiving money or gifts of monetary value (scholarships to institutions of higher learning are specifically exempted)”. While this language is deemed enough to prohibit NIL opportunities under other associations, additional clarification from the RIIL is needed. 

South Carolina 

Governing Body: South Carolina High School League 

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 685 – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Needs Clarity 

Governance: 21-22 By-laws 

Applicable Language: ARTICLE IX – Awards, Section 14 Amateur Status 

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. Article IX does not clearly address NIL, so further clarification is needed from the SCHSL. 

South Dakota 

Governing Body: South Dakota High School Activities Association 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Under Membership Considerations 

Governance: South Dakota High School Activities Association Constitution and Bylaws 

Applicable Language: Section 5 Awards, Section 6 Amateur Standing 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. However, SDHSAA administration has confirmed they are reviewing their policy and exploring what is best for the membership and student-athletes. 

Tennessee 

Governing Body: Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association 

State NIL Law: House Bill 1351 – Does not apply to high school athletes 

Status: Under Membership Considerations 

Governance: 2021-22 TSSAA Handbook 

Applicable Language: Section 18 Amateur Rule, Section 19 Award Rule 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. However, though TSSAA administration has confirmed there have been relatively few inquiries regarding NIL opportunities there are intentions to address the topic at the December legislative council meeting. 

Texas 

Governing Body: Texas University Interscholastic League 

State NIL Law: Senate Bill 1385 – Prohibits high school athletes from engaging in NIL activities; 

” (j) No individual, corporate entity, or other organization may: 

(1) enter into any arrangement with a prospective student athlete relating to the prospective student athlete’s name, image, or likeness prior to their enrollment in an institution of higher education; or 

(2) use inducements of future name, image, and likeness compensation arrangement to recruit a prospective student athlete to any institution of higher education. “ 

Status: Confirmed Prohibited 

Governance: 2021-2022 UIL Constitution 

Applicable Language: Section 441: AMATEUR ATHLETIC STATUS, Subchapter O. AWARDS 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Unlike most states, it is not the high school association prohibiting the opportunity, but rather the recently adopted NIL Texas State law. 

Utah 

Governing Body: Utah High School Activities Association 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Permitted** 

Governance: HANDBOOK 2021-22 

Applicable Language: SECTION 6: Amateur Rule, SECTION 7: Prohibition of Awards 

Notes: While there has been no direct confirmation from the administration, the existing amateurism rules do not clearly address NIL opportunities and their permissibility. Further clarification from the UHSAA is needed on this topic. 

Vermont 

Governing Body: Vermont Principals Association 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Permitted** 

Governance: High School Policies 

Applicable Language: Amateur Status Rulings and Comments 

Notes: While there has been no direct confirmation from the administration, the existing amateurism rules do not clearly address NIL opportunities and their permissibility. Further clarification from the VPA is needed on this topic. 

Virginia 

Governing Body: Virginia High School League 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Confirmed Prohibited 

Governance: Handbook and Policy Manual 2019-20 

Applicable Language: 28B-2-1 AMATEUR RULE 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration confirmed Section 28 which states a student-athlete’s amateurism status is lost by receiving “compensation or benefit, directly or indirectly, for the use of name, picture and/or personal appearance, as an athlete in that sport, or provides endorsement, as an athlete in that sport, in the promotion of a commercial or profit-making event, item, plan or service.” 

Washington 

Governing Body: Washington Interscholastic Activities Association 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Needs Clarity 

Governance: 2021-2022 Handbook 

Applicable Language: 18.24.0 AMATEUR STANDING 

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. Section 18 addresses promotions for a business product or service, but does not address all types of NIL activities. Further clarification is needed from the WIAA. 

West Virginia 

Governing Body: West Virginia Secondary School Activities Commission 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Needs Clarity 

Governance: Rules & Regulation Handbook 2021-22 

Applicable Language: §127-2-11. Amateur, §127-3-5. Awards 

Notes: The current regulations are unclear on the topic of NIL. Subsection 127 states a student-athlete loses their amateurism status by, “capitalizing on athletic fame by receiving money or gifts of monetary value (scholarships to institutions of higher learning are specifically exempted)”. While this language is deemed enough to prohibit NIL opportunities under other associations, additional clarification from the WVSSAC is needed. 

Wisconsin 

Governing Body: Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Confirmed Prohibited 

Governance: 2020-21 WIAA High School Rules 

Applicable Language: III. Students, C. Amateur Status 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration confirmed Section III which states a student-athlete’s amateurism status is lost by “receiving compensation or benefit, directly or indirectly, for the use of name, picture and/or personal appearance as an athlete because of ability, potential and/or performance as an athlete”. 

Wyoming 

Governing Body: Wyoming High School Activities Association 

State NIL Law: N/A 

Status: Confirmed Prohibited 

Governance: 2021-22 Handbook 

Applicable Language: 2.7.0 WHSAA Awards, 5.7.0 Amateur Standards 

Notes: The current regulations prohibit student-athletes from monetizing their NIL. Further information from the administration confirmed Section 5.7.0 which states a student-athlete’s amateurism status is lost by receiving “capitalizing on athletic fame by receiving money, gifts of monetary value, or merchandise”. 

About this data 

This information was gathered in three phases – first, the individual states with NIL laws in place were examined for provisions applicable to high school and prospective student-athletes. In most cases, the NIL State laws were isolated to collegiate student-athletes. Second, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) member and affiliate state associations handbooks were individually analyzed, specifically the amateurism and awards-based policies. Upon review of the current rules, individual state associations were identified under one of the following statuses: 

  • Permitted**, meaning, under the existing bylaws, it appears high school student-athletes under the corresponding association have the freedom to monetize their NIL, to varying degrees. 
  • Needs Claritymeaning, under the existing bylaws, it appears high school student-athletes under the corresponding association may have the freedom to monetize their NIL, however the rules may only permit certain types of NIL activities. 
  • Prohibited**meaning, under the existing bylaws, it appears high school student-athletes under the corresponding association are prohibited from being compensated for their NIL. 

Finally, in order to provide the most comprehensive answers, direct contact was made via email and phone with each athletic association. If a clear response was provided directly from a member of the association’s staff, the status was updated to one of the following; 

  • Confirmed Permittedmeaning, under the existing bylaws, it is confirmed that high school student-athletes under the corresponding association have the freedom to monetize their NIL, to varying degrees. 
  • Under Membership Considerations”, meaning, under the existing bylaws, it is confirmed NIL and amateurism rules will be discussed and/or addressed in upcoming leadership meetings. 
  • Confirmed Prohibited”, meaning, under the existing bylaws, it is confirmed that high school student-athletes under the corresponding association are prohibited from being compensated for their NIL. 

This data is intended to encompass the varying permissibility of NIL opportunities available to student-athletes. If there is any information which appears to be incorrect, please contact NIL Specialist, Braly Keller (braly.keller@opendorse.com).  

Previous

Next

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *